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Category: The Arboretum

Vinca Meadow

Vinca Meadow

Some plants are pretty yet called invasive, but what can one harmless plant do? Somewhere in the 1950’s or maybe 60’s, long before the environmental movement came into being or used the word ‘invasive’ to describe plants or even really understood the consequences of planting certain non-native plants, Pastor Althouse planted a small area of his property with Vinca. Now, 60 years later you can see Vinca covering a large area of the 17 acre property. While beautiful, with periwinkle…

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Sensitive Fern

Sensitive Fern

Onoclea sensibilis The native Sensitive Fern is called sensitive because it shrivels up at the first sign of frost. It is well adapted to wet or moist soils, where it spreads out happily (and quickly) by rhizomes. In slightly drier areas it spreads more slowly though it does not tolerate completely dry soil and will dry up until next Spring if it is too dry.  It’s rather coarse texture is a welcome addition to a shady rain garden or along…

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Great Blue Lobelia

Great Blue Lobelia

Lobelia siphilitica If you’ve got a wet spot Great Blue Lobelia (also called the Blue Cardinal Flower) is the plant for you. A native of Pennsylvania Great Blue Lobelia attracts hummingbirds, butterflies and is an exceptional plant for bumble bees and other pollinators we count on. It’s happy in sun or part shade, grows 2′ to 3′ tall and provides blue blooms for late Spring. It’s been around a long time. Iroquois used it for a cough medicine. The Meskwaki…

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Cicada Killer Wasp

Cicada Killer Wasp

I was startled to see this sight on our fence and called Dave out. Dave is known for keeping odd facts in his head and immediately identified the sight as a Cicada Killer Wasp killing a Cicada. Within a few moments the wasp flew off with the cicada! Amazing! Here is a website called “Cicada Mania” if you are interested in learning more: http://www.cicadamania.com/cicadas/10-facts-about-cicada-killer-wasps/ Paula Ziegler is a local resident who has a concern for the fate of bees, butterflies…

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New York Ironweed

New York Ironweed

Vernonia noveboracensis Common Name: New York Ironweed I am really enjoying how these purple flowered plants are framing our bird house. About 6 feet tall, New York Ironweed is great for the back of your garden. Although these plants prefer slightly moist soils, ours are doing fine in average conditions. New York Ironweed is native to eastern United States. Information on New York Ironweed: http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/PlantFinder/PlantFinderDetails.aspx?kempercode=g160 Paula Ziegler is a local resident who has a concern for the fate of bees,…

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