Browsed by
Author: Nancy Baker

Brown Eyed Susan

Brown Eyed Susan

Rudbeckia triloba This is a short-lived native perennial but it self-seeds so that you never know it’s gone! Covered with small daisy like flowers with brown centers it can grow up to 5′ tall and will brighten the garden for several weeks during mid-summer. Plant in full sun in average soil. Cut back after flowering to encourage rebloom or if you do;t want it to seed (you want some of course!). You can learn more here. This plant will be…

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Sensitive Fern

Sensitive Fern

Onoclea sensibilis The native Sensitive Fern is called sensitive because it shrivels up at the first sign of frost. It is well adapted to wet or moist soils, where it spreads out happily (and quickly) by rhizomes. In slightly drier areas it spreads more slowly though it does not tolerate completely dry soil and will dry up until next Spring if it is too dry.  It’s rather coarse texture is a welcome addition to a shady rain garden or along…

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Lily of the Valley

Lily of the Valley

Convallaria majalis Lily of the Valley is an intoxicatingly fragrant perennial bulb. Tiny white bell flowers appear in Spring and make delightful cut flowers. It can make a good ground cover for small areas. Spreads slowly but lives for a long time.  One of the few flowering plants that prefer shade. Keep it in your garden though, it can be invasive in natural areas. More information. Save Save

Orange Day Lilies

Orange Day Lilies

Hemerocallis fulva  While there are Day Lilies native to the area, Orange Day Lilies are. They were brought to the United States in the 19th century and once planted spread rapidly through their roots and can be invasive creating dense patches that natives can’t penetrate. That being sai many gardeners (including early owners of the Arboretum) value them for their hardiness and enjoy watching them open one flower at a time that lasts one day.   They last a long…

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Lenten Rose

Lenten Rose

Helleborus x hybridus A flower that begins to bloom in February and lasts until May? That’s the Lenten Rose. Though the flowers point downward the leaves stay green throughout the winter and it’s not a favorite meal of deer!. Actually what we call flowers are the plants sepals and the flower is almost invisible but the sepals are beautiful! The plant faithfully comes back for years and the blossoms are beautiful floating in a bowl of water on your table…

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